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    Bruising (Holistic)

    Bruising (Holistic)

    About This Condition

    Those tender black and blue marks on your body are often reminders of an accidental bump, although they can be signs of an underlying health condition. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.
    • Sample a combo supplement

      Reduce your tendency to bruise by taking a daily combination of at least 400 mg of vitamin C and 400 mg of flavonoids, such as hesperidin or rutin

    • Fill up on fruits and veggies

      Help prevent bruising by eating more foods rich in vitamin C and flavonoids

    • Get a checkup

      If you bruise easily, visit your doctor to rule out a treatable medical problem

    About

    About This Condition

    Bruising occurs after traumatic injury and consists of swelling and discoloration under the skin but no disruption of the skin.

    Bruising is a normal body response to trauma. It is only when bruising occurs often and from very minor (often unnoticed) trauma that a problem may exist. Refer to the capillary fragility article for more information. While easy bruising is usually not a cause for concern, people who experience this problem should consult a physician to rule out more serious conditions that may cause bruising. Medical causes of easy bruising sometimes may be diagnosed from a few blood tests conducted by a doctor. More often, however, no clear cause for easy bruising is found.

    Symptoms

    Bruises look like areas of blue to purple-colored skin that may turn yellow to dark brown over the course of a few days.

    Eating Right

    The right diet is the key to managing many diseases and to improving general quality of life. For this condition, scientific research has found benefit in the following healthy eating tips.

    Recommendation Why
    Fill up on fruits and veggies
    Even minor deficiencies of vitamin C and possibly of flavonoids can lead to increased bruising. People who bruise easily may benefit from eating more fruits and vegetables, common sources of vitamin C and flavonoids.

    Even minor dietary deficiencies of vitamin C can lead to increased bruising. People who experience easy bruising may benefit from eating more fruits and vegetables?common dietary sources of vitamin C and flavonoids .

    Supplements

    What Are Star Ratings?

    Our proprietary ?Star-Rating? system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by some in the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

    2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

    1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    Supplement Why
    3 Stars
    Vitamin C
    400 to 800 mg daily, with flavonoids
    Learn More

    Doctors often suggest that people who experience easy bruising supplement with 100 mg to 3 grams of vitamin C per day for several months. Controlled research is limited, but vitamin C supplements have been shown to reduce bruising in people with low vitamin C intake.1 Flavonoids are often recommended along with vitamin C. Flavonoids are vitamin-like substances that can help strengthen capillaries and therefore may also help with bruising.2 Flavonoids may also increase the effectiveness of vitamin C; citrus flavonoids, in particular, improve the absorption of vitamin C. Older preliminary research suggested that vitamin C, 400?800 mg per day, in combination with 400?800 mg per day of the flavonoid, hesperidin, reduced bruising in menopausal women.3 A small, preliminary trial in Germany gave three people with progressive pigmented purpura (a chronic bruising disorder) 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C and 100 mg per day of the flavonoid rutoside. After four weeks, noticeable bruising was no longer apparent and did not recur in the three month period after treatment was stopped.4 Controlled research is needed to better establish whether vitamin C and flavonoids are effective for easy bruising.

    2 Stars
    Flavonoids
    400 to 800 mg hesperidin with vitamin C daily
    Learn More

    Doctors often suggest that people who experience easy bruising supplement with 100 mg to 3 grams of vitamin C per day for several months. Controlled research is limited, but vitamin C supplements have been shown to reduce bruising in people with low vitamin C intake.5 Flavonoids are often recommended along with vitamin C. Flavonoids are vitamin-like substances that can help strengthen capillaries and therefore may also help with bruising.6 Flavonoids may also increase the effectiveness of vitamin C; citrus flavonoids, in particular, improve the absorption of vitamin C. Older preliminary research suggested that vitamin C, 400?800 mg per day, in combination with 400?800 mg per day of the flavonoid, hesperidin, reduced bruising in menopausal women.7 A small, preliminary trial in Germany gave three people with progressive pigmented purpura (a chronic bruising disorder) 1,000 mg per day of vitamin C and 100 mg per day of the flavonoid rutoside. After four weeks, noticeable bruising was no longer apparent and did not recur in the three month period after treatment was stopped.8 Controlled research is needed to better establish whether vitamin C and flavonoids are effective for easy bruising.

    1 Star
    Arnica
    Refer to label instructions
    Learn More

    Arnica is considered by some practitioners to be among the best vulnerary (wound-healing) herbs available.9 As a homeopathic remedy, arnica is often recommended as both an internal and topical means to treat minor injuries. Some healthcare practitioners recommend mixing 1 tablespoon of arnica tincture in 500 ml water, then soaking thin cloth or gauze in the liquid and applying it to the injured area for at least 15 minutes four to five times per day.

    1 Star
    Comfrey
    Refer to label instructions
    Learn More

    Comfrey is also widely used in traditional medicine as a topical application to help heal wounds.10

    1 Star
    Sweet Clover
    Refer to label instructions
    Learn More

    In traditional herbal medicine, a compress or ointment of sweet clover is applied to bruises.11 , 12 Enough should be applied to cover the bruise, and several applications per day may be necessary to improve healing.

    References

    1. Schorah CJ, Tormey WP, Brooks GH, et al. The effect of vitamin C supplements on body weight, serum proteins, and general health of an elderly population. Am J Clin Nutr 1981;34:871?6.

    2. Shamrai EF. Vitamin P. Its chemical nature and mechanism of physiologic action. Uspekhi Sovremennoi Biologii 1968;65:186?201.

    3. Horoschak A. Nocturnal leg cramps, easy bruisability and epistaxis in menopausal patients: treated with hesperidin and ascorbic acid. Delaware State Med J 1959;Jan:19?22.

    4. Reinhold U, Seiter S, Ugurel S, Tilgen W. Treatment of progressive pigmented purpura with oral bioflavonoids and ascorbic acid: an open pilot study in 3 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol 1999;41:207?8.

    5. Schorah CJ, Tormey WP, Brooks GH, et al. The effect of vitamin C supplements on body weight, serum proteins, and general health of an elderly population. Am J Clin Nutr 1981;34:871?6.

    6. Shamrai EF. Vitamin P. Its chemical nature and mechanism of physiologic action. Uspekhi Sovremennoi Biologii 1968;65:186?201.

    7. Horoschak A. Nocturnal leg cramps, easy bruisability and epistaxis in menopausal patients: treated with hesperidin and ascorbic acid. Delaware State Med J 1959;Jan:19?22.

    8. Reinhold U, Seiter S, Ugurel S, Tilgen W. Treatment of progressive pigmented purpura with oral bioflavonoids and ascorbic acid: an open pilot study in 3 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol 1999;41:207?8.

    9. Weiss R. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 342.

    10. Weiss R. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 342.

    11. Moore M. Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1979, 152.

    12. Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C (eds). PDR for Herbal Medicines. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Co, 1998, 966?7.

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