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    Phyllanthus

    Phyllanthus

    Uses

    Common names:
    Bahupatra, Bhuiamla
    Botanical names:
    Phyllanthus niruri

    Parts Used & Where Grown

    Phyllanthus is an herb found in central and southern India. It can grow from 30?60 centimeters in height and blooms with many yellow flowers. Phyllanthus species are also found in other countries, including China (e.g., Phyllanthus urinaria), the Philippines, Cuba, Nigeria, and Guam.1All parts of the plant are used medicinally.

    What Are Star Ratings?

    Our proprietary ?Star-Rating? system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

    2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

    1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement,little scientific support.

    This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

    Used for Why
    2 Stars
    Hepatitis
    900 to 2,700 mg daily
    Taking the herb phyllanthus may be beneficial for people with hepatitis B.

    Phyllanthus (Phyllanthus amarus), an Ayurvedic herb, has been studied primarily in carriers of the hepatitis B virus, as opposed to those with chronic active hepatitis. In one trial, administering this herb for 30 days appeared to eliminate the hepatitis B virus in 22 of 37 cases (59%).3 However, other trials have failed to confirm a beneficial effect of Phyllanthus amarus against hepatitis B.4 , 5 A West Indian species, Phyllanthus urinaria (not widely available in the United States or Europe), has achieved much better results than Indian Phyllanthus amarus. 6 Thus, the specific plant species used may have a significant impact on the results. The amount of phyllanthus used in clinical trials has ranged from 900?2,700 mg per day.

    1 Star
    Pain
    Refer to label instructions
    Extracts of phyllanthus plants have shown a marked ability to decrease pain, apparently by decreasing inflammation. With liver-protective properties, they may be safer than drugs such as acetaminophen, which has toxicity to the liver.

    In animal research, alcohol/water extracts of plants from the genus phyllanthus (25 to 200 mg per 2.2 pounds body weight) have shown a marked ability to decrease pain.7 This family includes the plants Phyllanthus urinaria, P. caroliniensis, P. amarus, and P. niruri. Like aspirin , phyllanthus extracts appear to reduce pain by decreasing inflammation.8 Although they are six to seven times more potent than aspirin or acetaminophen 9 in test tube studies, extracts of these plants also demonstrate liver-protective properties,10 suggesting they may be safer than drugs such as acetaminophen, which has well-documented toxicity to the liver. The usefulness of phyllanthus extracts for treating pain in humans is unknown.

    Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

    Phyllanthus has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for over 2,000 years and has a wide number of traditional uses including internal use for jaundice, gonorrhea, frequent menstruation, and diabetes and topical use as a poultice for skin ulcers, sores, swelling, and itchiness. The young shoots of the plant are administered in the form of an infusion for the treatment of chronic dysentery.2

    How It Works

    Common names:
    Bahupatra, Bhuiamla
    Botanical names:
    Phyllanthus niruri

    How It Works

    Phyllanthus primarily contains lignans (e.g., phyllanthine and hypophyllanthine), alkaloids, and flavonoids (e.g., quercetin ).

    Phyllanthus blocks DNA polymerase, the enzyme needed for the hepatitis B virus to reproduce. In one study, 59% of those infected with chronic viral hepatitis B lost one of the major blood markers of HBV infection (e.g., hepatitis B surface antigen) after using 900 mg of phyllanthus per day for 30 days.11 While clinical trials on the effectiveness of phyllanthus for HBV have been mixed, the species P. urinaria and P. niruri seem to work better than P. amarus.12 Clinical trials with hepatitis B patients have used 900?2,700 mg of phyllanthus per day.

    How to Use It

    Research has used the powdered form of phyllanthus ranging from 900?2,700 mg per day for three months.13

    Interactions

    Common names:
    Bahupatra, Bhuiamla
    Botanical names:
    Phyllanthus niruri

    Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

    At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

    Interactions with Medicines

    As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
    The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers? package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

    Side Effects

    Common names:
    Bahupatra, Bhuiamla
    Botanical names:
    Phyllanthus niruri

    Side Effects

    At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

    References

    1. Bharatiya VB. Selected Medicinal Plants of India. Bombay: Tata Press, 1992, 235?7.

    2. Nadkarmi KM. India Materia Medica, vol 1. Bombay: Popular Prakashan Private Ltd., 1993, 947?8.

    3. Thyagarajan SP, Subramian S, Thirunalasundari T, et al. Effects of Phyllanthus amarus on chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Lancet 1988;2:764?6.

    4. Doshi JC, Vaidya AB, Antarkar DS, et al. A two-stage clinical trial of Phyllanthus amarus in hepatitis B carriers: Failure to eradicate the surface antigen. Indian J Gastroenterol 1994;13:7?8.

    5. Leelarasamee A, Trakulsomboon S, Maunwongyathi P, et al. Failure of Phyllanthus amarus to eradicate hepatitis B surface antigen from symptomless carriers. Lancet 1990;335:1600?1.

    6. Wang M, Cheng H, Li Y, et al. Herbs of the genus Phyllanthus in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: observations with three preparations from different geographical sites. J Lab Clin Med 1995;126:350?2.

    7. Santos AR, Filho VC, Yunes RA, et al. Analysis of the mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of extracts of plants from the genus Phyllanthus. Gen Pharmacol 1995;26:1499?506.

    8. Cechinel Filho V, Santos AR, De Campos RO, et al. Chemical and pharmacological studies of Phyllanthus caroliniensis in mice. J Pharm Pharmacol 1996;48:1231?6.

    9. Miguel OG, Calixto JB, Santos Ar, et al. Chemical and preliminary analgesic evaluation of geraniin and furosin isolated from Phyllanthus sellowianus, Planta Med 1996;62:146?9.

    10. Syamasundar KV, Singh B, Thakur RS, et al. Antihepatotoxic principles of Phyllanthus niruri herbs. J Ethnopharmacol 1985;14:41?4.

    11. Thyagarajan SP, Subramanian S, Thirunalasundar T, et al. Effect of Phyllanthus amarus on chronic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Lancet 1988:2:1017?8.

    12. Meixa W, Haowei C, Yanjun L, et al. Herbs of the genus Phyllanthus in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: observation with three preparations from different geographic sites. J Lab Clin Med 1995;126:350?2.

    13. Reichert R. Phytotherapeutic alternatives for chronic hepatitis. Quart Rev Natural Med 1997;Summer:103?8.

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