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    Low-Potassium Foods

    Low-Potassium Foods

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    Topic Overview

    Potassium is a mineral in your cells that helps your nerves and muscles work right. The right balance of potassium also keeps your heart beating at a steady rate.

    A potassium level that is too high or too low can be dangerous. If your levels are high or low, you may need to change the way you eat.

    • Low-potassium foods: Less than 100 mg
    • Medium-potassium foods: 101-200 mg
    • High-potassium foods: 201-300 mg
    • Very-high potassium foods: Over 300 mg

    You can control the amount of potassium you get in your diet by being aware of which foods are low or high in potassium. When choosing foods from lists like the one below, note the serving size. Otherwise, it can be easy to get too much or too little potassium.

    Content of select low-potassium foods footnote 1
      Serving size Potassium (mg)

    Bagel, plain, enriched

    4-inch

    67

    Bread, multi- or whole grain

    1 slice

    60

    Butter

    1 tbsp

    3

    Cake, angel food, store-bought

    1 piece, 28 g

    26

    Carbonated beverage (ginger ale, root beer, orange, grape, lemon-lime)

    12 fl oz

    4

    Cereal, ready-to-eat, puffed rice, fortified

    1 cup

    16

    Cereal, ready-to-eat, puffed wheat, fortified

    1 cup

    4

    Cheese, cheddar

    1 oz

    28

    Cheese, Swiss or mozzarella, whole milk

    1 oz

    22

    Coffee, brewed from grounds

    6 fl oz

    87

    Cranberry juice cocktail

    8 fl oz

    35

    Cucumber, peeled, raw

    ½ cup

    81

    Gelatin dessert, made from dry mix with water

    ½ cup

    1

    Grapes, red or green

    10 grapes

    96

    Hot dog, beef and pork

    1

    75

    Lemon

    juice of 1 fruit

    48

    Lettuce, iceberg, raw

    1 cup

    78

    Lime

    juice of 1 fruit

    44

    Macaroni, cooked, enriched

    1 cup

    62

    Mushrooms, white, raw

    ¼ cup

    56

    Oil (canola, peanut, safflower, sesame, soybean, or sunflower)

    1 tbsp

    0

    Olives, ripe, canned

    5 large, 22 g

    2

    Onion, raw

    1 slice, 14 g

    20

    Pear, canned, juice pack

    1 half fruit

    73

    Pizza, cheese topping, regular crust, frozen, cooked

    63 g serving

    96

    Popcorn, microwave, regular/air-popped

    1 cup

    20-26

    Radishes

    1 radish

    10

    Rice, white, long-grain, regular, cooked

    1 cup

    55

    Salt

    1 tsp

    0

    Sherbet

    ½ cup

    71

    Soup, chicken noodle, canned

    1 cup

    53

    Spaghetti, cooked, enriched or whole wheat

    1 cup

    62

    Spices: black pepper; chili powder; curry powder

    1 tsp

    28; 51; 31

    Spices, parsley, dried

    1 tbsp

    35

    Sugar, granulated/powdered

    1 tsp/1 tbsp

    0

    Teas: black, brewed; chamomile, brewed

    6 fl oz

    66; 16

    Tomato, cherry, red, ripe

    1 fruit

    40

    Tortilla chips, plain, white corn

    1 oz

    61

    Hidden potassium

    Some foods and drinks may have hidden potassium. Certain herbal or dietary supplements may also have it. Diet or protein drinks and diet bars often have this mineral. It is also in sports drinks, which are meant to replace potassium you lose during exercise.

    Food labels do not have to include the amount of potassium, but some do. Even if potassium is not listed, it may still be in that food.

    Do not use a salt substitute or "lite" salt without talking to your doctor first. These often are very high in potassium.

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    References

    Citations

    1. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (2012). USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. Available online: http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/ndl.

    Credits

    ByHealthwise Staff
    Primary Medical Reviewer Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
    Specialist Medical Reviewer Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator

    Current as ofNovember 14, 2014

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