Main content

    Health Information

    Constipation, Age 12 and Older

    Constipation, Age 12 and Older

    Topic Overview

    Constipation occurs when stools are difficult to pass. Some people are overly concerned with the frequency of their bowel movements, because they have been taught that a healthy person has a bowel movement every day. This is not true. Most people pass stools anywhere from 3 times a day to 3 times a week. If your stools are soft and pass easily, you are not constipated.

    Constipation is present if you have 2 or fewer bowel movements each week or you do not take laxatives and have 2 or more of the following problems at least 25% of the time:

    • Straining
    • Feeling that you do not completely empty your bowels
    • Hard stools, or stools that look like pellets
    • A feeling of being blocked up
    • You can't pass stools unless you put a finger in your rectum or use manual pressure to pass a stool.

    Constipation may occur with cramping and pain in the rectum caused by the strain of trying to pass hard, dry stools. You may have some bloating and nausea. You may also have small amounts of bright red blood on the stool or on the toilet tissue, caused by bleeding hemorrhoids or a slight tearing of the anus ( anal fissure ) as the stool is pushed through the anus . This should stop when the constipation is controlled.

    Constipation can mean the slow movement of stool through the intestines or problems releasing a stool.

    Slow transit constipation

    Lack of fiber is a common cause of constipation. Other causes include:

    Constipation is sometimes a sign of another health problem, such as diabetes, hypothyroidism , or hypercalcemia .

    Outlet delay constipation

    Constipation is sometimes caused by poor muscle tone in the pelvic area (outlet delay). Excessive straining, needing manual pressure on the vaginal wall, or feelings of incomplete emptying may be a symptom of this type of constipation. Outlet delay constipation is caused by:

    Constipation is more common in people older than 65. People in this age group are more likely to have poor dietary habits and increased medicine use. Older adults also often have decreased muscular activity of the intestinal tract, which increases the time it takes for stool to move through the intestines. Physical problems, such as arthritis , may make sitting on the toilet uncomfortable or painful.

    Women report problems with constipation more often than men.

    If a stool becomes lodged in the rectum (impacted), mucus and fluid may leak out around the stool, sometimes leading to leakage of fecal material (fecal incontinence). You may experience this as constipation alternating with episodes of diarrhea.

    Check your symptoms to decide if and when you should see a doctor.

    Check Your Symptoms

    Are you constipated?
    Constipation means your stools are hard and you have trouble passing them. If your stools are soft and pass easily, you are not constipated.
    Yes
    Constipation
    No
    Constipation
    How old are you?
    Less than 12 years
    Less than 12 years
    12 years or older
    12 years or older
    Are you male or female?
    Male
    Male
    Female
    Female
    Do you have moderate or severe belly pain?
    This is not the cramping type of pain you have with diarrhea.
    Yes
    Abdominal pain
    No
    Abdominal pain
    Are your stools black or bloody?
    Yes
    Black or bloody stools
    No
    Black or bloody stools
    Have you had:
    At least 1 stool that is mostly black or bloody?
    At least 1 stool mostly black or bloody
    At least 1 stool that is partly black or bloody?
    At least 1 stool partly black or bloody
    Streaks of blood in your stool?
    Streaks of blood in stool
    Have you had any stool leak from your rectum?
    Yes
    Leaking stool
    No
    Leaking stool
    How much leakage has there been?
    Sometimes with severe constipation you may leak a little bit of loose stool. This usually isn't serious, but you also shouldn't ignore it. Sudden leakage of a lot of stool is more serious.
    A lot of stool
    Leakage of large amount of stool
    A small amount of stool
    Leakage of small amount of stool
    Has there been a recent injury to the rectum or vagina?
    Physical or sexual abuse and other injuries to these areas can cause problems like rectal pain and bleeding, urination problems, constipation, and vaginal bleeding.
    Yes
    Recent injury to rectum or vagina
    No
    Recent injury to rectum or vagina
    Do you have pain in the rectal area?
    Yes
    Rectal pain
    No
    Rectal pain
    How bad is the pain on a scale of 0 to 10, if 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst pain you can imagine?
    8 to 10: Severe pain
    Severe pain
    5 to 7: Moderate pain
    Moderate pain
    1 to 4: Mild pain
    Mild pain
    Does the rectal pain last for more than 30 minutes after you have a bowel movement?
    Yes
    Rectal pain continues for more than 30 minutes after bowel movement
    No
    Rectal pain continues for more than 30 minutes after bowel movement
    Is pain preventing you from having a bowel movement?
    Yes
    Rectal pain is preventing bowel movement
    No
    Rectal pain is preventing bowel movement
    Do you think that a medicine could be causing the constipation?
    Think about whether the constipation started after you began taking a new medicine or a higher dose of a medicine.
    Yes
    Medicine may be causing constipation
    No
    Medicine may be causing constipation
    Is constipation a new problem for you?
    Yes
    Constipation is a new problem
    No
    Constipation is a new problem
    Do you have other symptoms, such as a fever, shaking chills, or vomiting?
    Yes
    Other symptoms, such as fever, shaking chills, or vomiting
    No
    Other symptoms, such as fever, shaking chills, or vomiting
    Have you tried home treatment for constipation for more than 1 week?
    Home treatment includes things like drinking plenty of water; eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains; and getting some exercise every day.
    Yes
    Tried home treatment for constipation for more than 1 week
    No
    Tried home treatment for constipation for more than 1 week
    Can you have a bowel movement without the help of a laxative?
    Yes
    Able to have bowel movement without using laxatives
    No
    Unable to have bowel movement without using laxatives
    Have you been using laxatives for more than 2 weeks?
    Yes
    Has been using laxatives for more than 2 weeks
    No
    Has been using laxatives for more than 2 weeks

    Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause constipation. A few examples are:

    • Antacids.
    • Antidepressants.
    • Some blood pressure medicines.
    • Cold medicines (antihistamines).
    • Calcium and iron supplements.
    • Narcotic pain medicines.

    Pain in adults and older children

    • Severe pain (8 to 10): The pain is so bad that you can't stand it for more than a few hours, can't sleep, and can't do anything else except focus on the pain.
    • Moderate pain (5 to 7): The pain is bad enough to disrupt your normal activities and your sleep, but you can tolerate it for hours or days. Moderate can also mean pain that comes and goes even if it's severe when it's there.
    • Mild pain (1 to 4): You notice the pain, but it is not bad enough to disrupt your sleep or activities.
    Constipation, Age 11 and Younger

    Try Home Treatment

    You have answered all the questions. Based on your answers, you may be able to take care of this problem at home.

    • Try home treatment to relieve the symptoms.
    • Call your doctor if symptoms get worse or you have any concerns (for example, if symptoms are not getting better as you would expect). You may need care sooner.

    Many things can affect how your body responds to a symptom and what kind of care you may need. These include:

    • Your age. Babies and older adults tend to get sicker quicker.
    • Your overall health. If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you may need to pay closer attention to certain symptoms and seek care sooner.
    • Medicines you take. Certain medicines, herbal remedies, and supplements can cause symptoms or make them worse.
    • Recent health events, such as surgery or injury. These kinds of events can cause symptoms afterwards or make them more serious.
    • Your health habits and lifestyle, such as eating and exercise habits, smoking, alcohol or drug use, sexual history, and travel.

    Seek Care Today

    Based on your answers, you may need care soon. The problem probably will not get better without medical care.

    • Call your doctor today to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
    • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care today.
    • If it is evening, watch the symptoms and seek care in the morning.
    • If the symptoms get worse, seek care sooner.

    Seek Care Now

    Based on your answers, you may need care right away. The problem is likely to get worse without medical care.

    • Call your doctor now to discuss the symptoms and arrange for care.
    • If you cannot reach your doctor or you don't have one, seek care in the next hour.
    • You do not need to call an ambulance unless:
      • You cannot travel safely either by driving yourself or by having someone else drive you.
      • You are in an area where heavy traffic or other problems may slow you down.

    Make an Appointment

    Based on your answers, the problem may not improve without medical care.

    • Make an appointment to see your doctor in the next 1 to 2 weeks.
    • If appropriate, try home treatment while you are waiting for the appointment.
    • If symptoms get worse or you have any concerns, call your doctor. You may need care sooner.

    Blood in the stool can come from anywhere in the digestive tract, such as the stomach or intestines. Depending on where the blood is coming from and how fast it is moving, it may be bright red, reddish brown, or black like tar.

    A little bit of bright red blood on the stool or on the toilet paper is often caused by mild irritation of the rectum. For example, this can happen if you have to strain hard to pass a stool or if you have a hemorrhoid.

    Certain medicines and foods can affect the color of stool. Diarrhea medicines (such as Pepto-Bismol) and iron tablets can make the stool black. Eating lots of beets may turn the stool red. Eating foods with black or dark blue food coloring can turn the stool black.

    If you take a medicine that affects the blood's ability to clot, such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), or clopidogrel (Plavix), it can cause some blood in your stools. If you take a blood thinner and have ongoing blood in your stools, call your doctor to discuss your symptoms.

    Abdominal Pain, Age 12 and Older

    Home Treatment

    Constipation can be treated at home.

    • First:
      • Try gentle exercise. Take a short walk each day. Gradually increase your walking time until you are walking for at least 20 minutes.
      • Make sure you drink enough fluids. Most adults should try to drink between 8 and 10 glasses of water or noncaffeinated beverages each day. Avoid alcoholic beverages and caffeine, which can increase dehydration . If you have heart failure or kidney failure, talk to your doctor about what amount of fluid is right for you.
      • Include fruits, vegetables, and fiber in your diet each day. Have a bran muffin or bran cereal for breakfast, and try eating a piece of fruit for a mid-afternoon snack.
      • Schedule time each day for a bowel movement (after breakfast, for example). Establishing a daily routine may help. Take your time. Do not be in a hurry.
    • Support your feet with a small step stool [about 6 in. (15 cm)] when you sit on the toilet. This will help flex your hips and place your pelvis in a more normal "squatting" position for having a bowel movement.
    • If you are still constipated:
      • Add some processed or synthetic fiber-such as Citrucel, Metamucil, or Perdiem-to your diet each day.
      • Try a stool softener, such as Colace, if your stools are very hard.
      • Try a rectal glycerin suppository. Follow the directions on the label. Do not use more often than recommended on the label.
    • You may at times need to try a laxative. If your teen has constipation problems, talk to your teen's doctor before trying laxatives.
      • Osmotic laxatives (such as Fleet Phospho-Soda, Milk of Magnesia, or Miralax) and nonabsorbable sugars (such as lactulose or sorbitol) hold fluids in the intestine. They also draw fluids into the intestine from other tissue and blood vessels. This extra fluid in the intestines makes the stool softer and easier to pass. Drink plenty of water when you use this type of laxative.
      • Stimulant laxatives (such as Ex-Lax or Feen-a-Mint) speed up the movement of stool through the intestine. Use these preparations sparingly. Overuse of stimulant laxatives decreases the tone and sensation in the large intestine, causing dependence on using laxatives. Regular use may interfere with your body's ability to absorb vitamin D and calcium, which can weaken your bones. Do not use laxatives for longer than 2 weeks without consulting your doctor.
    • If you are still constipated, check your symptoms to determine if and when you need to see your doctor.
    • Talk to your doctor before using an enema. Your doctor may need to check your symptoms or may suggest a different way to treat your constipation.

    Symptoms to watch for during home treatment

    Call your doctor if any of the following occur during home treatment:

    • Constipation occurs or continues after 1 week of home treatment.
    • Rectal pain develops or increases.
    • Blood in the stool develops or increases.
    • Uncontrolled leakage of stool occurs.
    • Your symptoms become more severe or more frequent.

    If you have any of these symptoms, you need to be evaluated by a doctor.

    Prevention

    You can prevent constipation.

    • Drink plenty of fluids, enough so that your urine is light yellow or clear like water.
    • Add high-fiber foods to your diet. Try to get 20 to 35 grams of fiber a day. Packaged foods and fiber supplements include the amount of fiber content in the nutrition information. You should increase the amount of fiber in your diet slowly so that your stomach can adjust to the change. Adding too much fiber too quickly may cause stomach upset and gas.
      • Eat at least 1½ to 2 cups of fruit a day. Choose whole fruit instead of fruit juice.
      • Eat at least 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day.
    • Increase the amount of high-fiber foods, such as bran flakes, bran muffins, oatmeal, brown rice, beans, and lentils. Eat brown rice, bulgur, or millet instead of white rice.
      • Use whole wheat bread instead of white bread. Choose whole-grain breads and cereals; buy bread that lists whole wheat, stone-ground wheat, or cracked wheat in the ingredients.
      • Snack on unbuttered, unsalted popcorn.
      • Add 2 Tbsp of wheat bran to cereal or soup. If you do this, start slowly with 1 tsp a day. Gradually increase the amount to 2 Tbsp a day.
      • Mix 2 Tbsp of psyllium (found in Metamucil and other bulk-forming agents) with a fluid, and drink it.
    • Avoid alcohol beverages. They can increase dehydration.
    • Exercise more. A walking program would be a good start. For more information, see the topic Fitness.
    • Set aside relaxing times for having bowel movements. Urges usually occur sometime after meals. Establishing a daily routine for bowel movements, such as after breakfast, may help.
    • Go when you feel the urge. Your bowels send signals when a stool needs to pass. If you ignore the signal, the urge will go away, and the stool will eventually become dry and difficult to pass.

    Preparing For Your Appointment

    To prepare for your appointment, see the topic Making the Most of Your Appointment.

    You can help your doctor diagnose and treat your condition by being prepared to answer the following questions:

    • Is constipation an ongoing (chronic) problem for you, or is this a new or different problem? If it is chronic, when did it begin?
    • When did this episode of constipation begin?
    • When was your last normal bowel movement?
    • Have you recently changed your diet or fluid intake, decreased your activity level, or started a new medicine?
    • Have you recently changed your daily routine, such as a change in your job, school, or travel?
    • What have you tried to correct your constipation? Did it work?
    • Do you have any rectal bleeding?
    • Do you have rectal pain before, during, or after a bowel movement? If so, how long does the pain usually last?
    • Do you have any health risks?

    Credits

    By Healthwise Staff
    William H. Blahd, Jr., MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
    David Messenger, MD
    Last Revised August 1, 2013

    This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

    © 1995-2014 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.