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    Methionine

    Methionine

    Uses

    What Are Star Ratings?

    Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

    2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

    1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

    Used for Why
    2 Stars
    Pancreatic Insufficiency
    2,000 mg daily
    2 Stars
    Parkinson's Disease
    5 grams per day
    Preliminary trials have suggested that the amino acid methionine may effectively treat some symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    Preliminary trials have suggested that the amino acid , methionine (5 grams per day), may effectively treat some symptoms of Parkinson's disease.1

    1 Star
    HIV and AIDS Support
    Refer to label instructions
    One trial found that methionine may improve memory recall in people with AIDS-related nervous system degeneration.

    People with AIDS have low levels of methionine . Some researchers suggest that these low methionine levels may explain some aspects of the disease process,2 , 3 , 4 especially the deterioration that occurs in the nervous system and is responsible for symptoms such as dementia.5 , 6 A preliminary trial found that methionine (6 grams per day) may improve memory recall in people with AIDS-related nervous system degeneration.7

    In a preliminary trial, a thymus extract known as Thymomodulin® improved several immune parameters among people with early HIV infection, including an increase in the number of T-helper cells.8

    How It Works

    How to Use It

    Amino acid requirements vary according to body weight. However, average-size adults require approximately 800-1,000 mg of methionine per day-an amount easily obtained or even exceeded by most Western diets.

    Where to Find It

    Meat, fish, and dairy are all good sources of methionine. Vegetarians can obtain methionine from whole grains, but beans are a relatively poor source of this amino acid .

    Possible Deficiencies

    Most people consume plenty of methionine through a typical diet. Lower intakes during pregnancy have been associated with neural tube defects in newborns, but the significance of this is not yet clear.9

    Interactions

    Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

    At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

    Interactions with Medicines

    As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
    The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers' package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

    Side Effects

    Side Effects

    Animal studies suggest that diets high in methionine, in the presence of B-vitamin deficiencies, may increase the risk for atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) by increasing blood levels of cholesterol and a compound called homocysteine .10 This idea has not yet been tested in humans. Excessive methionine intake, together with inadequate intake of folic acid , vitamin B6 , and vitamin B12 , can increase the conversion of methionine to homocysteine-a substance linked to heart disease and stroke . Even in the absence of a deficiency of folic acid , B6 , or B12 , megadoses of methionine (7 grams per day) have been found to cause elevations in blood levels of homocysteine.11 Whether such an increase would create a significant hazard for humans taking supplemental methionine has not been established. Supplementation of up to 2 grams of methionine daily for long periods of time has not been reported to cause any serious side effects.12

    References

    1. Smythies JR, Halsey JH. Treatment of Parkinson's disease with l-methionine. South Med J 1984;77:1577.

    2. Muller F, Svardal AM, Aukrust P, et al. Elevated plasma concentration of reduced homocysteine in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;242-6.

    3. Revillard JP. Lipid peroxidation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. J Acquired Immunodef Synd 1992;5:637-8.

    4. Singer P, Katz DP, Dillon L, et al. Nutritional aspects of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol 1992;87:265-73.

    5. Tan SV, Guiloff RJ. Hypothesis on the pathogenesis of vacuolar myelopathy, dementia, and peripheral neuropathy in AIDS. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 1998;65:23-8.

    6. Keating JN, Trimble KC, Mulcahy F, et al. Evidence of brain methyltransferase inhibition and early brain involvement in HIV-positive patients. Lancet 1991;337:935-9.

    7. Dorfman D, DiRocco A, Simpson D, et al. Oral methionine may improve neuropsychological function in patients with AIDS myelopathy: results of an open-label trial. AIDS 1997;11:1066-7.

    8. Valesini G, Barnaba V, Benvenuto R, et al. A calf thymus lysate improves clinical symptoms and T-cell defects in the early stages of HIV infection: Second report. Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol 1987;23:1915-9.

    9. Shaw GM, Velie EM, Schaffer DM. Is dietary intake of methionine associated with a reduction in risk for neural tube defect-associated pregnancies? Teratology 1997;56:295-9.

    10. Toborek M, Hennig B. Is methionine an atherogenic amino acid? J Optimal Nutr 1994;3:80-3.

    11. McAuley DF, Hanratty CG, McGurk C, et al. Effect of methionine supplementation on endothelial function, plasma homocysteine, and lipid peroxidation. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1999;37:435-40.

    12. Leach FN, Braganza JM. Methionine is important in treatment of chronic pancreatitis. Br Med J 1998;316:474 [letter].

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